The Things i Wished i'd Said

“My life is a struggle between my need for acceptance, my fear of rejection, and a desire to not care at all.”
— Anonymous (via wnq-writers)

(via makeshiftburda)

Ben Affleck speaks about Islamophobia X

(Source: steven-gerrard, via whyislam)

poeticislam:

"In hijab I felt myself different. I felt myself purified and protected. I felt the company of Allah. As a foreigner, I felt sometimes uneasy in a public place, stared by men. With hijab, I was not seen. I found that the hijab sheltered me from such impolite stares. I was also very happy and proud in hijab which is not only the sign of my obedience to Allah but also the manifestation of my faith…besides, the hijab helps us to recognize each other and to share the feeling of sisterhoods. The hijab has also the advantage of reminding the people around me that God exists and reminding me of being with God. It tells me: "be careful. You should conduct yourself as a Muslim" As a policeman becomes more conscious of his profession in his uniform, I had a stronger feeling of being Muslim with hijab.
Soon, I started to put the hijab before my going out from the house whenever I went to the Mosque. It was a spontaneous and voluntary act and no body forced me to do so….
…For me…it was a trial to live in a small town in Japan, isolated completely from Muslims, But such isolation helped me to intensify my consciousness of being a Muslim. As Islam prohibits the women to disclose the body and to wear clothes which accentuate the body line, I had to abandon many of my clothes such as mini-skirts and half-sleeve blouses. Besides, the Western style fashion does not match with the hijab. I decided, therefore, to make a dress by myself. I asked a friend of mine who knew dress-making to help me, and in two weeks I made a dress with a “pantaloon” after the model of a ”Pakistani dress”. I did not mind people looking at my strange ”fashion”.”
-Sister Khula, a Japanese convert to Islam

poeticislam:

"In hijab I felt myself different. I felt myself purified and protected. I felt the company of Allah. As a foreigner, I felt sometimes uneasy in a public place, stared by men. With hijab, I was not seen. I found that the hijab sheltered me from such impolite stares. I was also very happy and proud in hijab which is not only the sign of my obedience to Allah but also the manifestation of my faith…besides, the hijab helps us to recognize each other and to share the feeling of sisterhoods. The hijab has also the advantage of reminding the people around me that God exists and reminding me of being with God. It tells me: "be careful. You should conduct yourself as a Muslim" As a policeman becomes more conscious of his profession in his uniform, I had a stronger feeling of being Muslim with hijab.

Soon, I started to put the hijab before my going out from the house whenever I went to the Mosque. It was a spontaneous and voluntary act and no body forced me to do so….

…For me…it was a trial to live in a small town in Japan, isolated completely from Muslims, But such isolation helped me to intensify my consciousness of being a Muslim. As Islam prohibits the women to disclose the body and to wear clothes which accentuate the body line, I had to abandon many of my clothes such as mini-skirts and half-sleeve blouses. Besides, the Western style fashion does not match with the hijab. I decided, therefore, to make a dress by myself. I asked a friend of mine who knew dress-making to help me, and in two weeks I made a dress with a “pantaloon” after the model of a ”Pakistani dress”. I did not mind people looking at my strange ”fashion”.”

-Sister Khula, a Japanese convert to Islam

“It seems apparent that we’ve been taught to face life as if it were a confrontation, always on guard, ready to slay the proverbial dragon…What if, it’s the other way around, that life should be viewed with gentle eyes - To see not from conditioned malfunction, but from that place within; from the innate wisdom that’s guiltless and undefiled like a virgin forest. The world may have temporarily rendered it invisible, but it’s there, we’re all born with it…Seek it from within your soul, for it cannot be learned…only remembered.”
http://ift.tt/1nW2LBM (via painting-a-picture)

(via unconditionedconsciousness)

bctaylor:

White Mosque, Yoyogi Uehara, Japan

bctaylor:

White Mosque, Yoyogi Uehara, Japan

(via skycloudsky)

Wounds don’t heal the way you want them to, they heal the way they need to. It takes time for wounds to fade into scars. It takes time for the process of healing to take place.

Give yourself that time. Give yourself that grace. Be gentle with your wounds. Be gentle with your heart. You deserve to heal. You have a right to know peace in your skin.

With love,

Dele Olanubi

(via bealightinthedark)

(via unconditionedconsciousness)

“The most precious gift we can offer others is our presence. When mindfulness embraces those we love, they will bloom like flowers.”
— Thich Nhat Hanh (via lazyyogi)

(via unconditionedconsciousness)

“But I also knew that one day, I would grow up. One day, I would be twenty, or thirty, or forty, even fifty and sixty and seventy and eighty and maybe even one hundred years old. And all those years were mine, they belonged to nobody but me. So even if I was unhappy now, it could all change tomorrow. Maybe I didn’t even need to jump off the cliff to experience that kind of freedom. Maybe the fact that I knew such a freedom existed in the world meant that I could someday find it.”
—  Augusten Burroughs, A Wolf at the Table (via thesoutherly)

(Source: mybookhaul, via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

“You don’t owe prettiness to anyone. Not to your boyfriend/spouse/partner, not to your co-workers, especially not to random men on the street. You don’t owe it to your mother, you don’t owe it to your children, you don’t owe it to civilization in general. Prettiness is not a rent you pay for occupying a space marked “female”.”
— Erin McKean, from “You Don’t Have to be Pretty" (via coffeeqveen)

(Source: hollabackboston, via e-ngram)

allahaljalil:

allahaljalil.tumblr.com
“And certainly, We shall test you with a bit of fear, hunger, loss of wealth, lives and fruits. But give glad tidings to the patient ones who, when afflicted with a calamity, say: “Truly! To Allah we belong and truly, to Him we shall return.” They are those upon whom are the blessings, descend from their Lord, and they receive His Mercy, and it is they who are guided.” (Surah Al-Baqarah 2:155-157)

allahaljalil:

allahaljalil.tumblr.com

“And certainly, We shall test you with a bit of fear, hunger, loss of wealth, lives and fruits. But give glad tidings to the patient ones who, when afflicted with a calamity, say: “Truly! To Allah we belong and truly, to Him we shall return.” They are those upon whom are the blessings, descend from their Lord, and they receive His Mercy, and it is they who are guided.” (Surah Al-Baqarah 2:155-157)

(via anotherbengali)